Continuity

This excerpt from a Faithlife/Logos e-mail (introducing the 2nd edition of the Faithlife Study Bible) helpfully expresses truth.

When you see the Bible in its ancient context, it comes to life as a body of literature that shaped God’s people.  These are the people who were known first as the sons of Jacob, the people of Israel, and later as the Jewish people, and from them came Jesus and the Christian tradition.  This is the true story of the whole world, of every person, and of our deep need for relationship with the God who made the universe.  This is the story of how God sought to know us and love us—by sending His Son to die and rise for us, so that we may truly live.

While I have not gravitated to the movement toward The Story, if that approach is well handled and if it doesn’t end there, it can probably be helpful.  More and more, I see continuity and progression and relationship in the motion from from Ancient Israel/Judaism toward Christianity.  I do also absolutely see a divide between “the Jews” (including Pharisees, scribes, priests, etc.) of Jesus’ day and the Christ-founded Way pictured to one degree or another in the gospels and then in the letters.  It is now necessary to make a distinction between Jewish and Christian faith.  Jewish faith is incomplete, i.e., it did not embrace the continuity of God’s story.

Many of us Christians would probably do well do see the continuity inherent in redemptive history, as Faithlife has it above:  “God’s people” were first identified as . . . and then . . . and now. . . .

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